New CNA Code of Ethics is now available

The CNA Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses is a statement of the ethical values of registered nurses and nurses licensed in extended roles, such as nurse practitioners. It demonstrates nurses’ commitments to persons with health-care needs and persons receiving care.

2017 highlights
This edition of the Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses contains new and updated content that reflects the contemporary practice needs of registered nurses and nurses licensed in extended roles. Examples include:
– New content addressing medical assistance in dying
– Updated terminology and definitions such as:
          – advance care planning
          – equity
          – primary health care
          – job action
          – medical assistance in dying
          – workplace bullying
– Updated ethics models including Oberle and Raffin Bouchal
– New content on advocating for quality work environments that support the delivery of safe, compassionate, competent and ethical care
– Updated references

Hard copies of the full 2017 edition of the Code and the pocket version are available for purchase:
See more, including nine e-learning modules, at:

 

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Canada’s Nursing Sisters

In honour of National Nursing Week (May 8th-14th), learn about the history of the Nursing Sisters in Canada. Battle nursing, a concept begun by Florence Nightingale, found its way to Canada in 1885.

“This tribute to Canadian Nursing Sisters tells of these brave and dedicated women. Their story is one of humour as well as anguish. It is a story of unyielding women who braved all the hardships of war to do their duty and serve their patients, and of those who nursed the casualties left in the wake of war.”

Enjoy the rest of this publication, retrieved from Veterans Affairs Canada’s Remembrance Series, at:
www.veterans.gc.ca/public/pages/remembrance/those-who-served/women-and-war/nursing-sisters/nursingsister_eng.pdf

Did you know?

There are over 45,000 medical-surgical Registered Nurses in Canada. Medical-surgical nurses form the largest single group of nursing professionals in health care and make up over 18% of all RNs working in Canada!
While nationally med-surg numbers are quite notable, CAMSN has just over 800 members. This leads us to believe that a lot of medical-surgical nurses simply don’t know about CAMSN.

Have you told your friends and colleagues about the Canadian Association of Medical and Surgical Nurses?

Help us increase our membership numbers. It’s FREE and joining is easy! Just have your friends and colleagues fill out the registration form located in the “Membership” tab and e-mail it to Crystal Côté, our secretary, at crystal.cote@mail.mcgill.ca.

Top 10 Reasons to be a CAMSN Member:

  1. Stay up-to-date with CAMSN activities
  2. Receive quarterly newsletters
  3. Connect with a community across Canada that shares a passion for medical-surgical nursing
  4. Expand your knowledge and skills, share in best practices and remain current, connected and relevant
  5. Access to CAMSN’s Standards of Practice
  6. Demonstrate your commitment to competence in your specialty area
  7. Opportunities to be featured or have your work featured in CAMSN’s quarterly newsletters
  8. Discounted CAMSN conference registration fees
  9. Access to archived newsletters and documentation from past conferences
  10. Work collaboratively with the Canadian Nurses Association

CNA’s Biennial Convention

CNA’s 2018 Biennial Convention is coming, and they welcome your ideas to help shape a successful event.

Save the date: June 18-20, 2018 in Ottawa!!

“Moving primary health care (PHC) forward for nursing and Canadians is a strategic priority for CNA. PHC is a philosophy and approach that is integral to improving the health of all Canadians and the effectiveness of health service delivery in all care settings. PHC focuses on the way services are delivered and puts the people who receive those services at the centre of care. We would like your input on how CNA’s 2018 biennial convention can help us all move this priority forward.” – Canadian Nurses Association

Please take five minutes to complete their survey by Friday, April 21, 2017.

 

CNA Certification is Making a Difference!

The Canadian Nurses Association recently shared a Literature Review outlining the positive impact that certification has had on patient outcomes:

  1. Mortality Rates & Failure to Rescue – Several studies found certified nurses were able to recognize and respond to a deteriorating patient quicker than non-certified nurses and that certification was associated with decreased mortality and failure to rescue rates (Cary, 2001; Martin, Arenas-Montoya & Barnetty, 2015; Kendall-Gallagher, Aiken, Sloane & Cimiotti, 201)
  2. Infection Control – Lower rates of central line associated bloodstream infections associated with higher rates of certified nurses (Boyle et al, 2014; William, Lopez & Lewis, 2013)
  3. Falls – Higher certification rates linked with lower total patient falls (Boltzet al, 2013; Kendall-Gallagher & Blegen (2009); Lange et al (2009)

Become part of the growing network of over 17,000 CNA-certified RNs across the country! Spring registration is currently open!! See the CNA Certification tab for more details.

National Nursing Framework on Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID)

At the 2016 CAMSN Conference, attendees had the honour of hearing from Dr. Qaiser Fahim MBBS, MHSc (Bioethics) on Patient-Directed Medical Assistance in Dying. Although his presentation was very informative, a number of questions were unable to be unanswered at that time as Bill C-14 was currently before the Senate.

After Bill C-14 was passed, a national task force, created by the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA), began developing a guide to assist Registered Nurses and Nurse Practitioners in their roles and ethical obligations regarding medical assistance in dying. On January 23rd, 2017, the CNA released its national nursing framework on medical assistance in dying (MAID).

Please see the following link for more information and access to the framework:
https://www.cna-aiic.ca/en/news-room/news-releases/2017/cna-leads-the-development-of-a-national-nursing-framework-on-medical-assistance-in-dying